The truth hurts

Emma Pennington, Hope,

Charcoal, 9” x 12”,

2020, Drawing I

Conspiracy theories are harmless until they distract us from the true origins of a problem. The theories behind the coronavirus make sense: there is a need for population reduction, so the government created the virus; it’s a way for countries to join together, thus work toward world peace; it was constructed to help slow global warming by limiting transportation. Some people even believe that the virus itself was just the universe’s way of giving us all time to slow down and find ourselves.

Although there is logic to some of these theories, by putting our energy into these questionable conclusions we are not examining the entirety of the issue nor are we trying to genuinely understand the root of the problem to prevent it from happening again.

The majority of the population know two general facts about COVID-19: it comes from China, and it has something to do with bats. But did you know that the majority of viruses and infectious diseases have been due to animal agriculture? This includes Ebola (bats), Swine Flu (pigs), and Mad Cow Disease.

Because people demand meat on their plate, animals are kept in conditions which create the environments that encourage viruses to develop. The viruses are then transmitted to humans through our contact with animals, whether it be our consumption of them or our handling of dead animals at the factory, and uncooked flesh at home. If we did not use animals for food, the COVID-19 strain of coronavirus almost certainly would have never been introduced to the human body.

I do think it’s important to question things. Don’t get me wrong, I love a good conspiracy theory, too- but this time it’s not okay. On one hand, this mass oblivion is because people are simply ignorant about the issue. In another way, it is because people refuse to take accountability for what their “choices” result in.

All I know is this: I have to deal with the consequences of other people’s food choices, and I’m pissed about it.